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Margaret Taylor

Margaret Taylor

Margaret Taylor (1788-1852) was an American first lady (1849-1850) and the wife of Zachary Taylor, an American military hero and the 12th president of the United States. Margaret supported her husband throughout his long military career, repeatedly uprooting her family to follow him to his postings, but was deeply unhappy with his move into politics—a move which culminated with his election as president in 1848. As first lady, she refused to host social events at the White House, leaving these duties to her youngest daughter Betty.

The youngest of seven children born to Ann Hance Mackall and Walter Smith, Margaret Mackall Smith grew up on a plantation in Calvert County, Maryland. From the few details revealed about her early life, it is known she enjoyed a prosperous upbringing; her father was an American Revolutionary War major-turned-successful tobacco planter, and she was related to some of the region’s most powerful figures through her mother’s side of the family. Margaret likely received lessons in sewing, music and household management that were typical to girls of her class, although she may have had additional training given the skills she later showed in adapting to frontier life.

Margaret was visiting her sister Mary Anne in Lousiville, Kentucky, when she was introduced to her future husband during the autumn of 1809. Then a 25-year-old army lieutenant, Taylor was on leave to visit his parents at their home outside of the city. He began courting the woman he referred to as “Peggy,” but in a foreshadowing of their future life together, he soon left to report to a post in Mississippi. After he returned to Kentucky the following spring, the Taylors were married at Mary Anne’s home on June 21, 1810.

In the three-plus decades that followed their marriage, Margaret slept in tents, cabins and forts as she accompanied her husband to various frontier postings. It was a lonely and occasionally perilous lifestyle; two of their children died of what Taylor labeled a “violent bilious fever” in 1820, and they sent their remaining four children away to be schooled in less hazardous environments. Margaret learned to make the most of her surroundings by establishing gardens and dairies, and helped maintain a wine cellar during a four-year stint in Michigan territory. She ended the peripatetic lifestyle while Taylor was still in active service, choosing to remain at a renovated cottage on the Mississippi River outside of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, for most of the 1840s.

Setting the tone for her social tendencies as first lady, Margaret attended her husband’s Inauguration but otherwise skipped any related formal functions. The press speculated as to the reasons for her absenteeism; as was the case two decades earlier with Rachel Jackson, the first lady was portrayed as a country simpleton who lacked the social graces to appear in public. Margaret merely preferred the company of close friends and family, with whom she was capable of discussing the relevant political issues of the day. And although her health was frail, she remained active by attending daily services at the neighboring St. John’s Episcopal Church.

Inconsolable when Taylor died from gastroenteritis after 16 months as president, Margaret holed away in her bedroom while his funeral was held in the East Room of the White House. Although she claimed a comfortable inheritance from the division of the Taylor estate, she chose to live with her children for her few remaining years and remained secluded from the public. She died suddenly while with her daughter Betty’s family in East Pascagoula, Mississippi, and was buried alongside her husband at the family grounds in Louisville.


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Margaret Taylor Burroughs 1917 –

“ Every individual wants to leave a legacy to be remembered for something positive they have done for their community, ” said Margaret Taylor Burroughs in Ebony. “ Long after I ’ m dead and gone, the [DuSable] museum will still be here. ” Artist and educator turned community activist, Burroughs was one of the founders of the Ebony Museum of African American History in 1961. “ A lot of black museums have opened up, ” stated Burroughs in Black Enterprise, “ but we ’ re the only one that grew out of the indigenous black community. We weren ’ t started by anybody downtown we were started by ordinary folks. ” Burroughs and her husband, Charles Gordon Burroughs, opened their home to the fledgling museum that was a result of the group ’ s efforts. Both of them realized that if they wanted an institution for preserving and displaying black heritage they would have to create it themselves.

In 1968, the museum ’ s name changed to DuSable in honor of Jean Baptist Pointe DuSable, a man of African ancestry, who, in the 1770s, became the first permanent settler in what would become Chicago. One of the museum ’ s founders suggested the name change because the City of Chicago had never properly recognized DuSable as the father of Chicago. The name change proved to be a shrewd economic move by the museum funding from the city for the museum soon arrived. In Black Enterprise Audrey Edwards stated, “ An institution named after the father of Chicago, the thinking went, would force the city to either aid the museum ‘ or always be embarrassed ’ if it didn ’ t. ” In 1973, the museum moved to its permanent location in Washington Park on Chicago ’ s South Side when the city turned over the vacant former administration building to the museum.

Margaret Taylor was born November 1, 1917, in the small community of St. Rose outside New Orleans to Alexander Taylor, a farmer, and his wife Octavia, a domestic laborer. After World War I, the Taylor family joined others in migrating from the South to urban areas in the North. Looking for better job opportunities, Alexander Taylor moved his family to Chicago where he found work in a railroad roundhouse and Octavia found work as a domestic laborer. In Chicago, young Margaret found educational opportunities that would have been unavailable to her in the South. She graduated from Englewood High School in 1933, and then earned a teaching certificate from Chicago Normal College in 1937. In 1939, Taylor received an upper-grade art certificate from the college, which had been renamed Chicago Teachers College before becoming Chicago State University.


Oxford affairs

AJP Taylor was a student in Vienna in 1933 when he was introduced to Margaret Adams, an English girl studying the piano. She came from a rich, upper-middle-class, Roman Catholic family - and had been educated in an English convent, from which she was attempting to emancipate herself.

She was small, musical, with a yen for literature, although she was not intellectual, or at least not academic as Taylor later - inaccurately - stated, "no intellectual woman attracted me sexually". They attended concerts together and fell in love. Taylor "worried about the future, doubtful whether her religious or family background would consort with mine. She had no such doubts."

He came back to England in 1930 to take up a post at Manchester university, but he had encouraged Margaret to return to Vienna to continue her piano studies: "Being full of cranky ideas of marriage, concocted from the writings of Wells and Shaw," he wrote, "I believed that every woman should have a career", and something to do with the piano was apparently Margaret's destiny. It was also his way of putting off any decision.

In 1931, Taylor moved to London to work on his first book. Margaret was also in London and, according to Taylor, "it seemed to me that we must either marry or break. I was reluctant to do either." He decided to broach the question and Margaret agreed to marry him. They set up house in Manchester. Her passion for music had continued, and this formed a strong link between them. He had a subscription to the evening concerts of the Halle: now they both went. Margaret continued her studies within a few years she was playing early music on the clavichord. She persuaded Philip Godlee, chairman of the Halle Orchestra, to start the Manchester Chamber Concerts Society. She was its secretary, and as a result of her determination, Manchester had the opportunity to hear all of the greatest quartets of the day.

The couple's move to Oxford in 1938, to enable Taylor to take up a post as fellow and tutor in modern history at Magdalen College, deprived them of the music and it also deprived Margaret of an absorbing avocation, with devastating results for the marriage. From mid-1940, Taylor's private life was pain and misery because of Margaret's infatuations, first with Robert Kee and then with Dylan Thomas the eventual outcome was divorce.

Taylor thought that the origin of Margaret's passion for Kee was a holiday in 1939. Taylor was 33, Margaret younger, their son Giles aged two. Kee, then 19, was handsome, desired by both sexes, by rumour experienced sexually, clever and interesting. He was one of Taylor's favourite undergraduates, and Taylor never blamed him for what happened.

The historian took his family and their nanny, Henrietta Kotlan, to Savoy that summer and Kee was among the visitors who came to stay. Taylor worked every morning on his book The Habsburg Monarchy, while Margaret spent time with Kee. When they all took walks together, she and Kee strode ahead and were quickly out of sight. According to Kotlan, Margaret "was already in love" with Kee before the holiday: "She was a very sweet, rather helpless creature with this falling in love all the time. But she couldn't help it. even I noticed that she lost interest in Giles." Taylor thought nothing of it, but when they returned to Oxford, things developed: he said "Margaret was falling passionately, unrestrainedly in love" with Kee. She harassed him in his lodgings, thrusting herself physically on him.

Taylor eventually found out about her obsession. "It puzzled me that Robert became increasingly reluctant to come to the house. One day, picking up the extension telephone in my room, I heard Robert say to Margaret: 'You know it is impossible for me to come to the theatre with you. I am sending the tickets back.' All became clear to me. I understood why Margaret hung about in the hall when she thought Robert might be coming to see me and why she grew listless at evening parties when he failed to appear."

Kee left Oxford in 1940 to join the Royal Air Force and Margaret, distraught, followed him to his camp. She tried to make contact with him and he had to warn the guard against her, cowering in the camp until he was certain that she had left. He became a bomber pilot and was finally out of reach. Things settled down for the Taylors, but one evening they went to see the film Brief Encounter. Taylor later wrote he "was speechless with agony and walked home feeling as though I were dead. Margaret merely complained that I was rather silent. It was the bitterest moment of my troubled life."

Kee was shot down and became a prisoner of war. At Margaret's urging, Taylor wrote to him regularly, which he did "more for his sake than for hers". Things were still wrong, as Taylor discovered when there were signs that the war would soon be over. "Margaret listened to every new bulletin on the wireless with passionate concentration. I realised she was thinking all the time of Robert. My hopes and illusions fell from me."

In July 1945 Margaret asked to travel to London with her husband, only later revealing that Kee was back in the country and would be coming for a drink. "We waited miserable and restless until after 10 when I went to bed. Robert appeared when I was already asleep. Margaret told Robert that our room was available for him if he wanted it. Nothing had changed. When I thought Margaret had been setting up the London room for me, she had been preparing it for Robert and planning all along for him to move in. Thus I lost both my London room and my peace of mind."

Kee began to visit their house in Oxford. But Margaret was soon to be thrown over. When Kee invited the Taylors to dinner in London. He seemed restless, watching the restaurant door. Taylor remembered: "Suddenly he said, 'Here she is' and introduced us to Janetta, already twice married and soon to marry Robert, who had soon wearied of [Margaret's] attentions. Time and again [she] tried to take Robert unawares. Robert complained to me. He complained to others and Margaret's infatuation became the common talk of Oxford, or so I thought. I felt humiliated and resentful. My last spark of affection for Margaret was extinguished."

In the autumn of 1946, Dylan and Caitlin Thomas turned up on the Taylors' doorstep. Dylan had been an unwelcome visitor before, and Taylor disliked him intensely. He stayed for a month, not for just a week or two. He drank on a monumental scale, 15 or 20 pints of beer a day which created a problem: Taylor kept a barrel in the house and did not intend to provide a constant supply for Thomas, so he tried to ration him. They had little in common: they did not share any literary interests, and Thomas did not like walking. He was a sponger. When he left, he told Taylor that he had lost the return half of his railway ticket, which Taylor thought a lie, and asked Taylor to lend him a couple of pounds. Taylor recalled he said: " 'I lend once and, unless repaid, once only.' Thomas did not repay the money. But this did not matter. I never expected to see Dylan again."

But here he was, this time with a wife, Caitlin, perhaps even more rambunctious. They were homeless and Margaret took pity on them, letting them take up residence in the summerhouse in the garden. "Dylan tried to borrow money from me, in which he did not succeed," said Taylor. "Thomas would go off to London to give a radio talk and spend the fee on drink. Then there would be a row with Caitlin. Dylan would cajole her in a wheedling Welsh voice, and Caitlin would succumb."

Margaret gave parties for them, introducing Thomas to literary circles around Oxford and even inducing Taylor to take him to dine at Magdalen High Table. Taylor records that he remarked to Caitlin that Margaret often appeared unbalanced, because she imagined that she was in love with Robert Kee. Caitlin's reply was: "Oh, no. she makes out that now she is in love with Dylan." Taylor, not surprisingly, was depressed at the prospect that there would be no end to Margaret's infatuations. She grew more obsessed with Thomas, turning herself into his patroness and the Taylors ended up paying for the Thomases' accommodation until the poet's death in 1953.

In the autumn of 1947, Margaret found Dylan and Caitlin the Manor House in South Leigh, 10 miles west of Oxford. According to Taylor, he paid about £2,000 for it, on condition that Margaret stop giving them money (a condition she failed to fulfil) and that they paid rent (which they hardly ever did). They moved in in September. Margaret was pleased because its relative closeness meant that she could keep an eye on Thomas. She bicycled out frequently, as did Taylor according to Thomas, writing to Caitlin, it was hell, with Margaret lecturing about art and Taylor making scenes on the road. Taylor was getting desperate. Reports reached him that Thomas "was boasting around the Oxford pubs that he had got the wife of a rich don hooked".

Margaret had inherited money when her mother died in 1941. She spent some of it on pictures: a Sickert, a Degas, a Renoir, a Utrillo. They began to disappear along with crystal decanters and the piano. "I might not have minded so much if it had not been for Dylan's boasting," recalled Taylor. The composer Elizabeth Lutyens was supposed to have heard Thomas say: "I'll have to see if I can squeeze Maggie's left breast and get some money."

By May 1948 the Thomases were tired of South Leigh: Thomas had convinced himself that he could only write good poetry if he once again lived in South Wales. Margaret had to agree. According to a friend of Caitlin, Margaret had "visions of returning with them, and setting up a threesome". Caitlin claimed that Margaret wrote to Thomas that "going to bed with you would be like going to bed with a god". Thomas had originally encouraged Margaret to write verse, sending her long critiques, seeming to take it seriously. Later he was cruel. According to Caitlin, "she and Dylan were standing in a bar, laughing about poor old Maggs behind her back, when they realised she was there, listening to them, the tears streaming down her mortified face".

After the couple moved to Wales, Caitlin wrote to a friend about a visit from Margaret: "It ended as usual, with floods of tears and recriminations, and heliotrope changes of colour, on the main street, on a Sunday, after a few harsh words of truth from Dylan. And she had been so sweet and diplomatic until then. Ebie [Williams, a taxi driver] was simply terrified taking her to the station, clutching a basket of spilling underclothes, and soiled intimacies, her blue hair straggling wildly over her face, her lipstick streaking dangerously down her neck and the wail of a lost banshee pursuing him to the ends of the earth."

The house was the Boat House at Laugharne, which Thomas had coveted in his youth. When it came on the market, Margaret sold the Manor House, and with the proceeds bought it for £3,000, two-thirds of her remaining capital, plus a further £136 for repairs to the roof and verandah. In 1949 the Thomases moved in. They were supposed to pay rent, although it was difficult for Margaret to extract it that scene described by Caitlin took place after Margaret insisted that they pay her £2 a week for seven years.

Taylor was fed up. He wrote to Thomas that he was destroying their marriage and that he should lay off, if only for the sake of the children Thomas never replied. With Kee, Margaret had sometimes been away for days now it was happening again. Taylor recalled that often, coming back from London to their Oxford home, "I found Holywell Ford deserted except for the children and our resident domestic". Mar garet had broken her promise not to give the Thomases money: Taylor was intensely unhappy about that.

It is unknown to what extent Margaret's passions were consummated. Taylor referred later to her "wild love affairs" but he always said that Kee acted honourably, while Caitlin's temper and ferocious possessiveness would have led her to attack Margaret had she suspected that Margaret and Thomas were sleeping together.

By 1950, Taylor decided that they should separate. He had asked for, and received, the promise of a sabbatical, which he proposed to spend in London, researching and writing The Struggle For Mastery In Europe. Margaret had suggested that Taylor should lease a house near Regent's Park in London and let their house in Oxford.The Taylors spent the whole summer in Oxford, "enjoying a family life at Holywell Ford for perhaps the last time . . . we packed up and moved to Park Village East. I settled Margaret in her house there and moved to a flat elsewhere. This was the end of my full family life for many years to come."

• This is an edited extract from Troublemaker: The Life and History of AJP Taylor by Kathleen Burk is published by Yale University Press at £19.95. To order it at £17.95 +99p p&p, call Guardian CultureShop on 0800 3166 102.


Contents

Burroughs was born Victoria Margaret Taylor in St. Rose, Louisiana, where her father worked as a farmer and laborer at a railroad warehouse and her mother as a domestic. She was raised there as a Catholic. [5]

The family moved to Chicago in 1920, when she was five years old. [6] There she attended Englewood High School along with Gwendolyn Brooks, who in 1985-1986 served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (now United States Poet Laureate). As classmates, the two joined the NAACP Youth Council. Burroughs earned her teacher's certificates from Chicago Teachers College in 1937. She helped found the South Side Community Arts Center in 1939 to serve as a social center, gallery, and studio to showcase African American artists. In 1946, Taylor-Burroughs earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in art education from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she also earned her Master of Arts degree in art education, in 1948. Taylor-Burroughs married the artist Bernard Goss (1913–1966), in 1939, and they divorced in 1947. In 1949, she married Charles Gordon Burroughs and they remained married for 45 years until his death in 1994. [7]

Taylor-Burroughs taught at DuSable High School on Chicago's South side from 1946 to 1969, and from 1969 to 1979 was a professor of humanities at Kennedy-King College, a community college in Chicago. She also taught African American Art and Culture at Elmhurst College in 1968. She was named Chicago Park District Commissioner by Harold Washington in 1985, a position she held until 2010.

She died on November 21, 2010. [8]

Margaret and her husband Charles co-founded what is now the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago in 1961. The institution was originally known as the Ebony Museum of Negro History and Art and made its debut in the living room of their house at 3806 S. Michigan Avenue in the Bronzeville neighborhood on Chicago's south side, [9] and Taylor-Burroughs served as its first Executive Director. [10] She was proud of the institution's grass-roots beginnings: "We're the only one that grew out of the indigenous Black community. We weren't started by anybody downtown we were started by ordinary folks." [11] Burroughs served as Executive Director until she retired in 1985 and was then named Director Emeritus, remaining active in the museum's operations and fundraising efforts. [12]

The museum moved to its current location at 740 E. 56th Place in Washington Park in 1973, and today is the oldest museum of black culture in the United States. Both the current museum building, and the Burroughs' S. Michigan Avenue home are now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and the house is a designated Chicago landmark.

Margaret Burroughs has created many of her own works of art as well. In one of Burroughs' linocuts, Birthday Party, both black and white children are seen celebrating. The black and white children are not isolated from each other instead they are intermixed and mingling around the table together waiting for a birthday cake. [13] An article published by The Art Institute of Chicago described Burroughs' Birthday Party and said: "Through her career, as both a visual artist and a writer, she has often chosen themes concerning family, community, and history. 'Art is communication,' she has said. 'I wish my art to speak not only for my people - but for all humanity.' This aim is achieved in Birthday Party, in which both black and white children dance, while mothers cut cake in a quintessential image of neighbors and family enjoying a special day together." [14] The painting puts in visual form Burroughs' philosophy that "the color of skin is a minor difference among men which has been stretched beyond its importance." [15]

Burroughs was impacted by Harriet Tubman, Gerard L. Lew, Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, and W.E.B. Du Bois. In Eugene Feldman's The Birth and Building of the DuSable Museum, Feldman writes about the influence Du Bois had on Burroughs' life. He believes that Burroughs greatly admired Du Bois and writes that she campaigned to bring him to Chicago to lecture to audiences. Feldman wrote: "If we read about 'cannabalistic and primitive Africa,'… it is a deliberate effort to put down a whole people and Dr. Du Bois fought this… Dr. Burroughs saw Dr. Du Bois and what he stood for and how he suffered himself to attain exposure of his views. She identified entirely with this important effort." Therefore, Burroughs clearly believed in Dr. Du Bois and the power of his message. [16]

In many of Burroughs' pieces, she depicts people with half black and half white faces. In The Faces of My People, Burroughs carved five people staring at the viewer. One of the women is all black, three of the people are half black and half white and one is mostly white. While Burroughs is attempting to blend together the black and white communities, she also shows the barriers that stop the communities from uniting. None of the people in The Faces of My People are looking at each other, and this implies a sense of disconnect among them. [13] On another level, The Faces of My People deals with diversity. An article from the Collector magazine website describes Burroughs' attempts to unify in the picture. The article says, "Burroughs sees her art as a catalyst for bringing people together. This tableau of diverse individuals illustrates her commitment to mutual respect and understanding." [17]

Burroughs once again depicts faces that are half black and half white in My People. Even though the title is similar to the previously referenced piece, the woodcut has some differences. In this scene, there are four different faces – each of which is half white and half black. The head on the far left is tilted to the side and close to the head next to it. It seems as both heads are coming out of the same body – taking the idea of split personalities to the extreme. The women are all very close together, suggesting that they relate to each other. In The Faces of My People, there were others pictured with different skin tones, but in My People all of the people have the same half black and half white split. Therefore, My People focuses on a common conflict that all the women in the picture face. [18]


Margaret Burroughs

Margaret Taylor-Burroughs (November 1, 1915 – November 21, 2010), also known as Margaret Taylor Goss, Margaret Taylor Goss Burroughs or Margaret T G Burroughs was an African-American artist and writer and a co-founder of the DuSable Museum of African American History. She also helped to establish the South Side Community Art Center, whose opening on May 1, 1941 was dedicated by the First Lady of the United States Eleanor Roosevelt. There at the age of 23 Burroughs served as the youngest member of its board of directors. She was a prolific writer, with her efforts directed toward the exploration of the Black experience and to children, especially to their appreciation of their cultural identity and to their introduction and growing awareness of art.

She is also credited with the founding of Chicago’s Lake Meadows Art Fair in the early 1950s. At its inception there were very limited venues and galleries for African American Artists to exhibit and sell their artwork, so she launched the Fair, which rapidly grew in popularity and became one of the most anticipated exhibitions for artists, collectors and others throughout the greater Chicago area. After a brief hiatus beginning in the early 1980s, it was resurrected by Helen Y. West in 2005 – and another of Margaret Burroughs’ legacies lives on.


America’s Oldest Museum of Black Culture Started in a Living Room

Today, the DuSable Museum of African American History is a Chicago landmark. In 1961, it was started in the living room of Margaret Taylor-Burroughs.

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Born on this day in 1915, Taylor-Burroughs started what was then called the Ebony Museum of Negro History in the downstairs of her house with a group of other concerned citizens and her husband, Charles Burroughs. The museum, which is the oldest independently owned museum of black culture in the United States, was created to preserve, study and teach black history and art.

She was extremely qualified for the job as a longtime teacher, artist and public historian. Taylor-Burroughs, who died in 2010, described how she founded the museum and its early years in an interview with public historian John E. Fleming in 1999.  

“We collected various things and when people heard what we were doing they had various things, and they brought them, and we cleared all of the furniture out of the first-floor parlor for the museum,” she said.

In the beginning, the small museum taught classes on how to teach black history, she said. Students started visiting. By 1973, the museum needed more space and moved into its current digs within Washington Park. Today, it's a Smithsonian affiliate, and its collections include a significant collection of 19th and 20th century works by African-American artists, such as the Freedom Mural and historical artifacts like this quilt cover made in 1900, as well as an archives.

Its name also changed. Taylor-Burroughs said that the word “Ebony” was removed from the name partly because it was the name of Ebony Magazine, which was headquartered nearby. In time, it took on the name DuSable after Jean Baptiste Point DuSable, who was Chicago’s first non-indigenous settler according to the Encyclopedia of Chicago. DuSable was an Afro-French fur trader, the encyclopedia writes.

“ The DuSable quickly became a resource for teaching African American history and culture and a focal point in Chicago for black social activism,” writes the encyclopedia, “particularly because of limited cultural resources then available to Chicago's large black population. Through the years, the museum has served as nerve center for political fundraisers, community festivals, and social and civic events serving the black community.”    

The Ebony Museum was one of a number of “neighbourhood museums” dealing with black history that were founded in the United States in the 1960s, writes historian Andrea A. Burns.  

“While battling often adverse conditions, the leaders of these institutions elevated the recognition of black history and culture, provided space for community gatherings, and attempted to develop a strong sense of identity and self-affirmation among African-American audiences,” she writes.  

“We weren’t started by anybody downtown we were started by ordinary folks,” Taylor-Burroughs  said about the DuSable. 

About Kat Eschner

Kat Eschner is a freelance science and culture journalist based in Toronto.


Margaret Taylor

Maragaret Swinderby BORN: June 12, 1578, Copenhagen Knhavn, Kobenhavn, Denmark. CHRISTENING: June 12, 1578, Copenhagen, Knhavn, Knhavn, Denmark. DEATH: July 2, 1672, Hadleigh, Babergh District, Suffolk, England. BURIAL: July 3, 1672, Saint Mary's Churchyard, Hadleigh, Babergh District, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. MARRIAGE: October 9, 1599, Hadley, Middlesex, London, England, Thomas John "Capt." Taylor, II. CHILDREN: 1. Richard Taylor, BORN: November 15, 1596 in Litchfield, Staffordshire, England. 2. William Taylor, BORN: 1599 in Prestbury, Cheshire, England. 3. Robert Taylor, BORN: November 7, 1601 in Pennington Castle, Cumberland, England. DEATH: 1699 in Essex County, Virginia, United States. 4. Margaret Ellen Taylor, BORN: September 10, 1603 in Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland, England. 5. Colonel William Taylor, I, BORN: July 8, 1605 in Carlisle, Cumberland, England, DEATH: June 12, 1687, Accomack, Virginia, United States. 6. John "Immigrant", I Taylor, BORN: August 10, 1607 in Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland County, England. DEATH: January 1652 in Lancaster County, Virginia, United States. 7. William Taylor, BORN: on September 12, 1609 in Bishops Frome, Hereford, England or Prestbury, Cheshire, England. DEATH: 1636 in New Kent, England. 8. Jane Taylor, BORN: December 25, 1609. 9. Colonel James Taylor, I, BORN: August 10, 1607, Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland, England, DEATH January 10, 1652 in Lancastershire, England. 11. Anna Cary Taylor, BORN: in 1611 in Pennington Castle, Cumberland, (now Warwickshire), England, DEATH: March 13, 1657 in Windmill Point, Warwick, Virginia, United States. 14. Richard Taylor, BORN: 1615 in Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland, England, DEATH: 1699 in Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland, England. 15. Thomas Taylor was BORN: March 30, 1618, Hadleigh, Suffolkshsire, England, DEATH: 1686 in Rappahanock County, Virginia, United State PARENTS: Andrew Swinderby, 1546-1579. Margaret M Anderson, 1550-1644.

“Readers are likely to find many erroneous references on the internet that the Ann/Anne Taylor (Anne Cary) who married Miles Cary was the daughter of the Thomas Taylor who married Margaret Swinderby, but as that Thomas is documented as having died in England in 1618 it is impossible that he was the father of Anne who married Miles Cary.”


Marjorie Taylor Greene, Conspiracy Theorist and 'Christian Values' Candidate for Congress, Allegedly Has a History of Extramarital Affairs

Marjorie Taylor Greene , the rightwing conspiracy theorist and noted bigot who is all but assured to win her race for Congress in Georgia, has been described as a “Donald Trump in heels.” And according to a New Yorker profile of the future member of Congress and her race , that comparison between Greene and Trump is even more apt than we thought—Greene, who enjoys talking up her strong belief in traditional family values, allegedly has quite a history of extramarital affairs.

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Greene often describes herself as a wife, a mother, and a Christian and as someone who will bring those values to D.C. But according to Jim Chambers, the former owner of the CrossFit gym that Greene later took over, it seems part of Greene’s family values is sleeping with men who are not her husband. From the New Yorker:

[W]hen the former gym owner, Jim Chambers, first met Greene, he got the sense that it “had kind of taken her life over,” he told me. “She had a lot of time and a lot of money,” he said, and also a vague ambition, as he saw it, “to run a gym.” When, eight years later, it looked like she might be headed to Congress, Chambers got on social media and told the world that, back when he knew Greene, she was having “multiple, blatant extramarital affairs in front of all of us.” He added, “I don’t even judge that, until you say the kind of shit she does and claim the Jesus about it.”

The New Yorker also interviewed one of the men with whom Greene reportedly had an affair:

He asked not to be named and told me that he, too, was bothered by Greene’s hypocrisy. He provided me with a screenshot of a text exchange in which Greene acknowledged sleeping with him. “She never talked about politics,” he said. He told me he later learned that she was also sleeping with another man who was not her husband, “while the whole time being ‘super Christian.’ ” He added, “She’s not the pro-family, pro-Christian, strong-business woman she touts herself to be.”

Who knows, maybe she and her husband are swingers with an open marriage, which is a choice that I certainly don’t judge and in fact support! But that doesn’t seem what’s happening here. When asked by the New Yorker to respond to these allegations, Greene issued a vaguely worded threat. “Let me be clear with you,” Greene wrote in a text. “Writing defamatory articles about me is a very bad choice. Be very wise in who your ‘sources’ are.” (Chambers, according to her, is “Antifa,” which she is possibly basing on the fact that when he owned the CrossFit gym, he put up a sign that said “cops and active military were not welcome as members.”) Her attorney L. Lin Wood—who happens to also be one of the attorneys for Kyle Rittenhouse as well as Mark and Patricia McCloskey —described the profile as a whole as filled with “false accusations, half-truths, misrepresentations, out-of-context statements, and agenda driven lies,” but didn’t directly address the allegations that Greene engaged in numerous affairs.


Margaret Taylor

Maragaret Swinderby BORN: June 12, 1578, Copenhagen Knhavn, Kobenhavn, Denmark. CHRISTENING: June 12, 1578, Copenhagen, Knhavn, Knhavn, Denmark. DEATH: July 2, 1672, Hadleigh, Babergh District, Suffolk, England. BURIAL: July 3, 1672, Saint Mary's Churchyard, Hadleigh, Babergh District, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. MARRIAGE: October 9, 1599, Hadley, Middlesex, London, England, Thomas John "Capt." Taylor, II. CHILDREN: 1. Richard Taylor, BORN: November 15, 1596 in Litchfield, Staffordshire, England. 2. William Taylor, BORN: 1599 in Prestbury, Cheshire, England. 3. Robert Taylor, BORN: November 7, 1601 in Pennington Castle, Cumberland, England. DEATH: 1699 in Essex County, Virginia, United States. 4. Margaret Ellen Taylor, BORN: September 10, 1603 in Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland, England. 5. Colonel William Taylor, I, BORN: July 8, 1605 in Carlisle, Cumberland, England, DEATH: June 12, 1687, Accomack, Virginia, United States. 6. John "Immigrant", I Taylor, BORN: August 10, 1607 in Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland County, England. DEATH: January 1652 in Lancaster County, Virginia, United States. 7. William Taylor, BORN: on September 12, 1609 in Bishops Frome, Hereford, England or Prestbury, Cheshire, England. DEATH: 1636 in New Kent, England. 8. Jane Taylor, BORN: December 25, 1609. 9. Colonel James Taylor, I, BORN: August 10, 1607, Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland, England, DEATH January 10, 1652 in Lancastershire, England. 11. Anna Cary Taylor, BORN: in 1611 in Pennington Castle, Cumberland, (now Warwickshire), England, DEATH: March 13, 1657 in Windmill Point, Warwick, Virginia, United States. 14. Richard Taylor, BORN: 1615 in Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland, England, DEATH: 1699 in Pennington Castle, Carlisle, Cumberland, England. 15. Thomas Taylor was BORN: March 30, 1618, Hadleigh, Suffolkshsire, England, DEATH: 1686 in Rappahanock County, Virginia, United State PARENTS: Andrew Swinderby, 1546-1579. Margaret M Anderson, 1550-1644.

“Readers are likely to find many erroneous references on the internet that the Ann/Anne Taylor (Anne Cary) who married Miles Cary was the daughter of the Thomas Taylor who married Margaret Swinderby, but as that Thomas is documented as having died in England in 1618 it is impossible that he was the father of Anne who married Miles Cary.”


Watch the video: Margaret Taylor Speaks in the Tyndale House Publishers Chapel (January 2022).