History Podcasts

Marywood University

Marywood University

Marywood University is a coeducational, comprehensive, residential, and Catholic institution of higher learning, located in Scranton, Pennsylvania.The history of the university dates back to 1915, with the opening of a class of thirty-four women by the Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary sisters as Maryland College. Today, it has grown to a pioneer institution for graduate education in northeastern Pennsylvania.The university offers an array of undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs through its four academic colleges: the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of Creative Arts and Management, College of Health and Human Sciences, and College of Education and Human Development. in Studio Art are available.Situated on a hilltop, the university campus spreads over an area of 115 acres. A multimedia theatre, a 1,100-seat theatre, speech and hearing clinic, and extensive athletic fields for outdoor sports are some of the specialized facilities.Further, the Marywood Library is housed in the Learning Resources Center. The library includes a wide collection of more than 216,191 volumes, 338,191 items on microforms, 43,342 media items, 969 active periodical subscriptions in print and microfilm format as well as 9,000 full-text electronic journal titles.


The Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary came to Scranton, Pennsylvania, and established St. Cecilia's Academy in 1878 "for young ladies". Mount St. Mary's Seminary opened in 1902. Mother Cyril Conroy, superior in 1901, deliberately chose the term "seminary" (roughly equivalent to a high school in present times) to avoid the suggestion of a finishing school – which was a much more common destination at that time for older girls who could afford to continue their education – as it was intended to be "a place where young scholars dedicated themselves to serious study". The Motherhouse was co-located with the seminary. Its buildings suffered major damage during a fire in the 1970s. As a result, the Jesuit Scranton Preparatory School, then a boys' school, became co-educational to accommodate the girls. [5] The arch, now known as "Memorial Arch", which stood at the entrance to the seminary-cum-motherhouse, still stands on the present-day campus and the former seminary's name can be seen engraved on it.

The seminary was the next time step to the Sisters' ultimate goal: to open a women's college in Scranton. Marywood College opened with 34 students and Mother Germaine O'Neil as president and treasurer. It was the fifth Catholic women's college in the United States. [6] The first batch of students graduated in 1919 with a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Letters. By the 1930s, the college had diversified its curriculum, offering subjects ranging from the social sciences to pre-medical. [7] In 1937, the Sisters turned down an invitation to merge with St. Thomas College, then under the Christian Brothers. St. Thomas later came under the administration of the Jesuits after World War II and is now the University of Scranton. [8]

By the 1970s, other single-sex Catholic colleges and universities in the Diocese such as College Misericordia and King's College were becoming co-educational and Marywood followed suit, opening its doors to male students in the fall of 1989. [9] In 1997 it was granted university status by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. [10]

Over half the campus is located in Dunmore. [11] [12]

Marywood's programs are administered through four degree-granting colleges, with 60 bachelor's degree, 36 master's degree, two doctoral degrees, two terminal degrees by program (MFA, Ed.S.). All students are required to complete a core curriculum in the liberal arts in addition to the courses in their major. Undergraduates may also enroll in double majors, honors, and independent study programs, practicums, internships, and study abroad, as well as Army and Air Force ROTC programs.

The university is structured into three colleges: [13]

  • College of Arts and Sciences
    • Departments:
      • Art
      • Communication Arts
      • English and Foreign Languages
      • Music, Theatre, and Dance
      • Philosophy and Religious Studies
      • Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science
      • Social Sciences
      • Galleries
      • Radio and TV Station
      • Undeclared Majors
      • Departments:
        • Communication Sciences & Disorders
        • Nutrition, Athletic Training, and Exercise Science
        • Nursing
        • Physician Assistant
        • Psychology and Counseling
        • Social Work
        • Human Physiology Lab
        • Departments:
          • Architecture
          • Business and Global Innovation
          • Education
          • Ph.D Strategic Communication and Administrative Studies and MPA Program
          • Professional Continuing Education

          Marywood University is an NCAA Division III school and member of the Atlantic East Conference. The official name given is the Marywood Pacers. Marywood competes at the varsity level in baseball, basketball, cross-country, field hockey, golf, lacrosse, rugby, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field, and volleyball. [14] Students may also choose from more than 30 intramural programs, including club sports, as well as fitness options, recreational classes, and activity clubs. Marywood University's Mascot's name is Maxis Gillet after the Founder of the IHM Sisters, Mother Theresa Maxis and their Chaplain, Fr. Louis Gillet.

          Marywood University is home to about 20 different buildings on its campus, including the following: [15]

          • The Center for Natural and Health Sciences houses several academic departments, including Mathematics, Science, Nursing, and Administrative Studies.
          • The Swartz Center for Spiritual Life, opened in 2007, contains the Marian Chapel, Campus Ministry, and Conference and Event Services.
          • The Fricchione Day Care Center, built in 1991, is a child development center for children of Marywood staff, faculty, and students.
          • Immaculata Hall was built in the 1950s. It was originally called Alumnae Hall, and it was renamed to honor Sister M. Immaculata Gillespie, Marywood's first dean. It houses the President's Office and the Office of Planning and Institutional Research.
          • The Insalaco Center for Studio Arts, completed in 2001, houses the Kresge Gallery and features drawing and painting studios showcasing naturally-lit rooms with fine views of the campus. There are studios and equipment for woodworking, fiber arts, jewelry-making, ceramics, sculpture, photography, printmaking, a computer Mac lab, and private and semi-private studios for upper level BFA, MA, and MFA students.
          • The Learning Commons, is a 21st Century library that focuses on actively empowering the learner. It is a scholars’ gathering place, where students from all disciplines converge, collaborate, and expand their horizons ever further. The facility includes traditional library services & facilities, a state of the art automatic book-retrieval system, knowledge bar & atrium, regional archives, center for Communication Arts, entrepreneurial launchpad, center for transformational teaching and learning, private and group study rooms, a cafe, audio/visual rooms, seminar rooms, and a memorial garden. It is also home to TV Marywood and VMFM-FM 91.7.
          • The Liberal Arts Center houses many academic departments, including Religious Studies, Philosophy, Social Sciences, English, and Foreign Languages. The Admissions Office is also located here. The LAC also features the MarywoodRotunda.
          • Maria Hall, one of the original campus structures, now houses the University Development/Advancement Office.
          • The Center for Athletics and Wellness includes a 1,500 seat arena, a 5,000-square-foot (460 m 2 ) fitness center, and other athletic facilities. The center also includes the Aquatics Center opened in 2011, it has an 8-lane NCAA regulation pool, 3-meter diving board, 1-meter diving boards, competition gutters, and seating for 200 spectators.
          • The Memorial Arch, built in 1902, originally held the inscription "Mt. St. Mary's" and marked the entrance to the original Motherhouse, which was the location of Mt. St. Mary's seminary. Even though the Motherhouse was destroyed by fire in 1971, the arch still stands as the welcoming landmark at the entrance of the campus. The statue of the Virgin Mary on top of the arch is often referred to by students as the "Electric Mary" due to its halo encircled by light bulbs. The original stone steps to the Motherhouse are behind the arch.
          • The Michael and Gwen Calabro Delfino Amphitheatre, built in 2017, is an outdoor performing arts space with natural tiered lawn and is used for academics, staged art, outdoor exhibitions, and recreation.
          • The Memorial Commons was built in 1975 as a memorial to the original IHM Motherhouse that burned down in 1971. The Memorial Commons was renovated during the construction of the Learning Commons and was renamed the Motherhouse and Seminary Morgan Memorial Garden, dedicated on Marywood’s Centennial Anniversary, September 8, 2015.
          • The Nazareth Student Center, built in 1964, houses the main dining room, a lounge, a game room, the university bookstore, the Office of Student Activities and Leadership Development, and other university offices.
          • The O'Neill Center for Healthy Families, built in 2002, houses academic programs and research facilities.
          • The Sette LaVerghetta Center for Performing Arts, built in the 1950s as Assumption Hall, was rededicated in honor of Sette LaVerghetta in 1998. It houses the Music, Theatre, and Dance department.
          • The Center for Architectural Studies, completed in fall 2009, is a state-of-the-art example of sustainable design. It is a spacious, adaptive re-use of Marywood's former gymnasium. It has two levels of studios, a woodshop, a computer-aided design (CAD) laboratory, and a student lounge. It houses the region's first and only school of architecture.
          • The Tony Domiano Early Childhood Center, built in 2000, provides space for about 60 children in pre-school and kindergarten.
          • The Shields Center for Visual Arts serves Marywood's art students. It has classroom space for the graphic design, illustration, art history, and art therapy programs, as well as a 24-hour drop-in Mac lab. It also houses three art galleries: Mahady Gallery, Suraci Gallery, and Maslow Study Gallery.
          • The McGowan Center for Graduate and Professional Studies, renovated in 1998, was previously known as the Center for Human Services. It houses the College of Professional Studies and the Counseling/Student Development Center.
          • The Veterans Resource Center, formerly Bethany Hall, houses the Office of Military and Veteran Services and provides a gathering place for the Student Veteran Alliance. Student veterans are welcome to use the center's community lounge, quiet study space, and kitchen.
          • Loughran Hall is a residence hall for freshman students only and accommodates up to 324. Room doors are secured through a card access system and a staffed security desk is located on the terrace level of the building. There are ADA compliant rooms which are handicap accessible. Laundry rooms, study rooms, TV rooms, and public use microwaves are located on several floors. This building is connected to the Swartz Center for Spiritual Life.
          • Madonna Hall is an upperclassmen residence hall with co-educational floors. Room doors are secured through a card access system and a staffed security desk is located on the first floor of the building. There are ADA compliant rooms which are handicap accessible. Laundry rooms are located on each floor of the building. Study areas are located on multiple floors. Madonna Hall has a professional kitchen and a small movie theatre for resident use.
          • Regina Hall, originally named O'Reilly Hall, was the first student residence built at Marywood in the late 1920s. After the Motherhouse was destroyed by fire in 1971, the area that had once been the formal dining room was converted for use as a chapel. The chapel was then converted to what is now the Liguori Center. Regina Hall is still a residence hall today.
          • Immaculata Hall,(Closed) originally built in the 1950s and named Alumnae Hall, was later renamed Immaculata Hall to honor Sister M. Immaculata Gillespie, Marywood's first dean. Immaculata has two floors of single-room dorms for resident students.
          • Emmanuel Hall(Closed) provides specialty housing for 25 upperclass students in primarily 4-person rooms. The residence includes a kitchen and large common area.
          • Perpetual Help Hall(Closed) houses up to 14 male resident students. and includes a living room, kitchen, study area, and laundry room.
          • McCarty Hall,(Closed) dedicated in November 1941, was once used as a practice house for students majoring in vocational home economics. The hall burnt down and is no longer used for residents.
          • The Woodland Residences provide apartment-style living for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Each unit houses between four, five or ten upperclass students.
            , Roman Catholic nun, educator, and social worker , primetime newsbreak presenter for MSNBC , American artist , notable drag queen and reality television personality , née Bridget Jean Collins, playwright and author, Please Don't Eat the Daisies. , voice actress for anime such as Pokémon
        • Archbishop Joseph Kurtz, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops
        • Ben Walsh and Adam McIlwee, guitarists for Tigers Jaw (Master's of fine arts, 1971), Mayor of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania (1988-1996) [16]
        • Marywood University was declared an arboretum in 1975 in honor of Sister Maria Laurence Maher, then Professor of Biological Sciences, and received its official designation as such in 1997. It now contains 42 species of trees (103 varieties) and a comparable collection of shrubs, ornamental grasses, and flowers. [17]


          About Us

          The Fricchione Day Care Center at Marywood University provides quality child care to those who wish to pursue career, personal, or educational goals. It is our goal to provide a loving atmosphere that emphasizes the development of the whole child-mind, body, and spirit. The Fricchione Center is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children and is rated a STAR IV early childhood facility.

          The Fricchione Day Care Center was founded on the belief that children learn through their interaction with other children and adults. The program strives to meet the developmental needs of each child to enhance the cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development of each child.

          Our Philosophy

          Our History

          Beginning in September 1991, the Fricchione Day Care Center opened its doors to the children of Marywood&rsquos students, staff, and faculty as well as to children of employees from the IHM Convent and St. Joseph&rsquos Center. The Fricchione Day Care Center also serves alumni and the general public on a space available basis. Marywood&rsquos main purpose in establishing the Center is to provide quality care and learning experiences for those who wish to pursue career, personal, and/or educational goals.

          Our Affiliates


          Marywood University - History

          The Scranton Iron Furnaces in South Scranton are a historic reminder of the nation's rich industrial past.

          Our Place in History

          Incorporated in 1866, the City of Scranton is named in honor of George W. and Seldon Scranton, who founded the operation that became the Lackawanna Iron and Coal Company in 1840.

          The original inhabitants of the area were Capoose and Lenape Indian tribes, with white settlers arriving in the mid-18th century. Permanent settlement of the area dates back to 1788, when it was known as Deep Hollow. A gristmill, sawmill and charcoal furnace were established along the Lackawanna River, and over the years, Scranton&rsquos names progressed along with the landscape. Prior to being named Scranton in 1851, the area was known as Unionville, Slocum Hollow, Harrison and Scrantonia.

          Development continued, and by the late 1880s, Scranton was one of the nation&rsquos leading industrial centers, earning the title of &ldquoAnthracite Capital of the World.&rdquo Laborers and entrepreneurs from around the world came to the city to mine anthracite coal, pour iron for tee-rails, operate railroads and work in textile mills. After the turn of the century, Scranton&rsquos economy took a downturn. Oil replaced coal as the most popular choice of energy, and mining ceased in the area by the 1950s.

          From industry to innovation, Scranton is now home to a growing downtown business district and several institutions of higher education, including The University of Scranton, Marywood University, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, Lackawanna College, and Johnson College. With a vibrant arts community and a diverse population, there is plenty of opportunity to honor the city's rich past while progressing into the future.


          Editorial Reviews

          Review

          When two teenage boys, Edmund Keen and Paul Freach, didn&rsquot make it home after leaving school on November 1, 1973, the town of Scranton, Pa., was forever changed, assert local historian Munley and attorney Mazzoni. Though William Wright was eventually caught and successfully convicted of murdering Freach and Keen due to Mazzoni&rsquos efforts as chief prosecutor. . . .the ensuing fear has remained. Here, the authors recount the early days of the investigation&mdashthe countless interviews with friends and relatives, the FBI bulletins, and the grim search for remains, as well as the tremendous stroke of luck that led authorities to Wright. . . .The authors delve into the minutiae of the investigation, culminating in an epic recounting of Wright&rsquos trial. ― Publishers Weekly

          A terrifying trip inside an American nightmare. -- Michael Benson, author of The Devil at Genesee Junction

          Drawing upon their historical and legal expertise, the authors have presented, in plain language and granular detail, the tragic tale of a horrible crime that deserves wider notice and attention. -- Michael Flamm, Professor of History, Ohio Wesleyan University

          A spellbinding must read for true crime enthusiasts! It is a strong warning to the evil monsters that exist in our society today, and how a teen killer can slip through the cracks and prey on the innocents of our society. This is a tragic example of the great importance bestowed upon us to teach safety and awareness to families and children, which has been my mission for thirty plus years. I recommend this book to law enforcement, parents, and anyone who comes into contact with troubled youth. A MUST READ! -- Phil Chalmers, author of Inside the Mind of a Teen Killer featured on the LMN Network show Killer Kids


          Born Bridget Jean Collins in Scranton, Pennsylvania, to Tom and Kitty Collins, Kerr grew up on Electric Street in Scranton, and attended Marywood Seminary, the topic of her humorous short story "When I was Queen of the May." She received a bachelor's degree from Marywood College in Scranton and later attended The Catholic University of America, where she received her master's degree and met then-professor Walter Kerr. She later married Kerr, who became a well-known New York drama critic, and they had six children—Christopher, twins Colin and John, Gilbert, Gregory, and Kitty. The Kerrs bought a home in New Rochelle, New York, where Jean wrote King of Hearts, then settled in Larchmont, New York. [2] [3] She died in White Plains, New York of pneumonia in 2003.

          With her husband, Kerr wrote Goldilocks (1958), a short-lived Broadway musical comedy about the early days of silent film. She wrote several highly successful plays, including the Tony Award-winning King of Hearts as well as the comedy Mary, Mary, which ran for 1,572 performances. King of Hearts was later adapted to the screen as That Certain Feeling. [4]

          Kerr also wrote many humorous magazine essays, typically about her family. Several collections of these were published in book form and became best-sellers. Her best-known book was Please Don't Eat the Daisies (1957), a humorous look at suburban life from the point of view of former city dwellers. The book was a national bestseller, later adapted for the screen as a vehicle for Doris Day and David Niven and subsequently the basis of a television situation comedy starring Pat Crowley.


          Between 1984 and 1986

          The Collection began to include more paintings along with the continuing interest in acquiring important prints and photography, including works by artists not from the United States, such as the Peter Bommels painting.

          During these three years works by John Beerman, Robert Cumming, Edward Henderson, and James Biederman were first purchased, in the years to follow the Maslows continued to purchase a significant number of important works by these two artists.

          Prints (selected)

          Four Panels from Untitled and Target with Four Faces by Jasper Johns
          The Kindergarten Robes by Jim Dine
          Two Paintings: Sleeping Muse by Roy Lichtenstein
          Radiance by Dorothea Rockburne
          Lament for Lorca by Robert Motherwell
          Two Boys on a Raft by Sandro Chia
          Telemone #1 by Francesco Clemente
          Campbell's Soup I (Onion, Black Bean, Pepper Pot) by Andy Warhol

          Photographs (selected)

          Eye/Ear, andThree Chairs/Mexico (plus 8 additional images) by Robert Cohen
          White Calla Lily, New York by Walter Winings Nelson

          Paintings (selected)

          Untitled (MP #126) and (MP #127) by Jack Goldstein
          Streets of Tupelo by Thornton Willis
          Go-Jo by James Biederman
          Young Man Frozen by a Waterfall by Steven Campbell
          The World is Breathing by John Beerman
          Untitled (54-85) by Peter Plagens
          New York - Natural History by Peter Bommels
          Vein, Vain, Vane by Edward Henderson

          Other Works on Paper (selected)

          Ba Boom by James Biederman
          Hemisphere and Industry Bowl by Robert Cumming


          The Wood Word

          Legendary teenage sleuth Nancy Drew has been a significant figure in literature, television, video games and film since the 1930s. Now, The CW's "Nancy Drew" series proves that the titular character is.

          April 28, 2021
          Max Burke, Sports Editor

          When 12 European soccer clubs sought out to form the European Super League (ESL), it was clear to fans that greed was a driving force behind its establishment. The ESL consisted of the wealthiest clubs.

          April 28, 2021
          Emma Rushworth, Opinion Editor

          When same-sex marriage became legal in the United States in 2015, members of the LGBTQ community felt validated and liberated, myself included. However, six years after the decision in Obergefell v. Hodges.

          April 28, 2021
          Ellen Frantz, News Editor

          The COVID-19 vaccine roll-out has reached Marywood University’s campus. On April 8 and April 16, the university hosted pop-up vaccine clinics that allowed members of the Marywood community to receive.

          April 23, 2021
          Ellen Frantz, News Editor

          Film-lovers were on the edge of their seats when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced the postponement of the 93rd annual Academy Awards due to COVID-19. However, just like any good.


          Loan Record

          The Corcoran Gallery of Art
          Washington, D.C.

          Exhibition: "42nd Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting"
          Exhibition Dates: August 12 - November 30, 1991
          Catalogue: 42nd Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting

          Dome, 1990
          Willy Heeks
          Oil on canvas
          85" x 74"

          Whitney Museum of American Art
          New York, NY

          Exhibition: "Terry Winters" *
          Exhibition Dates: February 13 - May 3, 1992*

          Schema #60, 1985-86
          Vinyl, graphite and gouache on paper
          12" x 8 1/2"

          * This exhibition traveled and opened at: M.O.C.A., Los Angeles, CA

          September 7 - December 31, 1991

          Newport Harbor Art Museum
          Newport Beach, CA

          Exhibition: "Typologies: Nine Contemporary Photographers" *Exhibition Dates: Newport Harbor Art Museum, April 7 - June 2, 1991

          Catalogue: Typologies: Nine Contemporary Photographers

          Winding Towers
          Bernd and Hilla Becher
          9 gelatin silver prints
          20" x 16" (each)

          * This exhibition travelted to the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

          de Saisset Art Gallery and Museum
          University of Santa Clara

          Exhibition: "David Rankin: Witness - Paintings, 1989-1991"
          Exhibition Dates: January 18 - March 13, 1992
          Catalogue: David Rankin: Witness Paintings, 1989-1991

          Golgotha Stone I
          Acrylic, oil, and acrylic impasto on linen
          28" x 27 15/16"

          Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego

          Exhibition: "Robert Cumming: Cone of Vision" *

          Exhibition Dates: Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, 28 May - 4 August 1993

          Catalogue: Robert Cumming: Cone of Vision

          Industry Bowl , 1983
          Charcoal, acrylic and ink
          53" x 68"

          Burning Box #2 , 1988
          watercolor
          18 1/2" x 14"

          Small Constellation 3, 1987
          Oil on canvas
          84" x 72"

          * This exhibition traveld to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Contemporary Art Museum Houston, and The Contemporary Museum Honolulu

          Des Moines Art Center
          Edmundson Art Foundation, Inc.

          Exhibition: "Will Mentor: Food and Ornament"
          Exhibition Dates: June 23 - September 22, 1996

          The Lost Order, 1990
          Oil on canvas
          63 1/4" x 96'

          Sordoni Art Gallery
          Wilkes University
          Wilkes-Barre, PA

          Exhibition: "Gary Lang: Paintings and Objects 1975 - 1997"
          Exhibition Dates: May 11 - August 10, 1997

          Mirror # 33, 1991
          Acrylic on canvas
          72" x 60"

          Sordoni Art Gallery
          Wilkes University
          Wilkes-Barre, PA

          Exhibition: "Anthony Sorce: Four Decades"
          Exhibition Dates: March 15 - April 26, 1998

          Unpossible Being, James Beerman


          Dome, Willy Heeks


          Schema #60, Terry Winters


          Winding Towers, Bernd and Hilla Becher


          Small Constellation 3, Robert Cumming


          The Lost Order, Will Mentor


          Mirror #33, Gary Lang


          Marywood University

          Founded in 1915, Marywood University is a non-profit private higher-education institution located in the urban setting of the small city of Scranton (population range of 50,000-249,999 inhabitants), Pennsylvania. Officially accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, Marywood University (Marywood) is a small (uniRank enrollment range: 3,000-3,999 students) coeducational US higher education institution formally affiliated with the Christian-Catholic religion. Marywood University (Marywood) offers courses and programs leading to officially recognized higher education degrees in several areas of study. See the uniRank degree levels and areas of study matrix below for further details. This 105 years old US higher-education institution has a selective admission policy based on entrance examinations and students' past academic record and grades. The admission rate range is 70-80% making this US higher education organization a somewhat selective institution. International students are welcome to apply for enrollment. Marywood also provides several academic and non-academic facilities and services to students including a library, housing, sports facilities, financial aids and/or scholarships, study abroad and exchange programs, online courses and distance learning opportunities, as well as administrative services.


          Editorial Reviews

          Review

          When two teenage boys, Edmund Keen and Paul Freach, didn&rsquot make it home after leaving school on November 1, 1973, the town of Scranton, Pa., was forever changed, assert local historian Munley and attorney Mazzoni. Though William Wright was eventually caught and successfully convicted of murdering Freach and Keen due to Mazzoni&rsquos efforts as chief prosecutor. . . .the ensuing fear has remained. Here, the authors recount the early days of the investigation&mdashthe countless interviews with friends and relatives, the FBI bulletins, and the grim search for remains, as well as the tremendous stroke of luck that led authorities to Wright. . . .The authors delve into the minutiae of the investigation, culminating in an epic recounting of Wright&rsquos trial. ― Publishers Weekly

          A terrifying trip inside an American nightmare. -- Michael Benson, author of The Devil at Genesee Junction

          Drawing upon their historical and legal expertise, the authors have presented, in plain language and granular detail, the tragic tale of a horrible crime that deserves wider notice and attention. -- Michael Flamm, Professor of History, Ohio Wesleyan University

          A spellbinding must read for true crime enthusiasts! It is a strong warning to the evil monsters that exist in our society today, and how a teen killer can slip through the cracks and prey on the innocents of our society. This is a tragic example of the great importance bestowed upon us to teach safety and awareness to families and children, which has been my mission for thirty plus years. I recommend this book to law enforcement, parents, and anyone who comes into contact with troubled youth. A MUST READ! -- Phil Chalmers, author of Inside the Mind of a Teen Killer featured on the LMN Network show Killer Kids


          Watch the video: Marywood University 2017 (December 2021).